Dieppe View All Lesson Plans Dieppe

  • Landing craft en route to Dieppe, France, during Operation Jubilee, 19 August 1942.  

Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence / Library and Archives Canada / PA-171080
  • An unidentified Canadian soldier, who is armed with a Thompson machine gun, escorting a German prisoner who was captured during Operation JUBILEE, the Dieppe raid. England, 19 August 1942.

Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence / Library and Archives Canada / PA-210156
Landing craft en route to Dieppe, France, during Operation Jubilee, 19 August 1942. Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence / Library and Archives Canada / PA-171080
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The Dieppe raid of 1942 was a major event in Canada’s war experience. Of the 5,000 soldiers who participated, more than 900 were killed and another 1,874 were taken prisoner. Dieppe was also the site of the largest one-day aerial battle of the war. The Memory Project: Stories of the Second World War archive has several accounts of the battle.

Note: You may want students to use headphones if they are doing these activities independently. Alternatively, simply play the brief clips from war veterans through a pair of speakers.

ACTIVITY #1

Learning Outcomes:

1.    To appreciate and discuss Canada’s role at Dieppe.
2.    To compare information taken from an oral personal story to that taken from a text source.

Listen and Learn

Students can listen to the experiences of Royal Air Force pilot Douglas Warren and soldier Arthur Fraser as they recount their experiences at Dieppe.

 

Comparing Stories

Students can use the chart below to record information about the raid on Dieppe that they learned from listening to the veterans' stories about Dieppe. They can use the other column to record information they read in their history textbook or online at the Canadian Encyclopedia.

Questions

1.    In what ways is the information similar and in what ways is it different?
2.    What is the value of each of these accounts of Dieppe?
3.    What does Arthur Fraser's account of his experiences at Dieppe and at PoW camps tell us about the nature of war and its impact on people?
4.    What do you think it would have been like to be in a PoW camp for years?
5.    In your view, was the raid on Dieppe a failure, or a success that helped in future battles? Was it worth the losses suffered by Canada?

 



1 Comments
Nov 12, 2012 Ian Clarke

My father, Freddy Clarke, was flying tactical reconnaissance over Dieppe the morning of the raid. On his second sortie ove the French coast, around 11:00 am he was shot up by a Fokke Wulfe, but managed to turn back toward the Channel where he ditched not far from a passing landing craft taking survivors off the beach. He was knocked unconscious by the Mustang's impact with the water but miraculously the aircraft's air scoop did not immediately send it sinking nose down. Someone in the landing craft swam to his aircraft and pulled him from the cockpit before it sank and they were both pulled back aboard the landing craft and taken to the destroyer HMS "Calpe". We have never uncovered the name of the soldier or sailor who saved dad, but we are sure this story must have survived in his family just as it has in ours. We would dearly love to find out who it was and want to hear from anyone with knowledge of this event that was so momentous for our family.

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