Veteran Stories:
Frank Richard “Frank” Reycraft

Army

  • Frank Reycraft's wedding photo, taken in 1942.

    Frank Reycraft
  • Frank Reycraft wearing a gas mask, 1943.

    Frank Reycraft
  • 1600kg Weight Truck - the kind used to transport Prisoners of War.

    Frank Reycraft
  • Frank Reycraft, 1942 or 1943.

    Frank Reycraft
  • Specifications for the army truck Frank Reycraft drove.

    Frank Reycraft
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"A lot of prisoners of war I expect were like our own fellows; they weren’t anxious to see how many they could kill. If they were attacked, they’d fight."

Transcript

And I was the put on the Home War Establishment and as such, I was a truck driving instructor. It was trucks for pulling 25 pounder guns into position for firing. Half the troops were French; young fellows, they didn’t want to be in the Army. Quebecers didn’t want to be in the Army, particularly the young fellows didn’t. The ones we knew, anyway. They just didn’t want to be conscripted into the service. We were instructed to not make an issue of the, half of them being French. Treat those the same as any other students we had. We hauled timbers from Chalk River, for example, what they used to pave the, well, not exactly pave but surface the driving compounds. And occasionally take a load of prisoners. We took them to, it was a prisoner-of-war camp north of Petawawa. I don’t remember the name of it. But we drove them to that and took them in and they were dirty, they weren’t, they didn’t have the chance to clean up. I think they were mainly Italian. A lot of prisoners of war I expect were like our own fellows; they weren’t anxious to see how many they could kill. If they were attacked, they’d fight. I saw so many good friends go over and some of them came back and some didn’t. That sort of thing. So all I could do was do my part towards winning the war by training drivers.
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