Veteran Stories:
David R. Weddel

Air Force

  • The Avro Anson, the twin-engine bomber David Weddel trained on before graduating as a pilot.

    David Weddel
  • Pilot Officer David Weddel in Brantford, Ontario, after graduating and receiving his wings in October, 1944.

    David Weddel
  • David Weddel, 2011.

    David Weddel
  • Graduating Class 105 (ATP), in Oshawa, Ontario, 1943. They were the last class to graduate before the school in Brantford closed. David Weddel is in the lower picture, front row, second from the right.

    David Weddel
  • Portrait of David Weddel taken in 1943, while he was in training at the Elementary Flying Training School in Oshawa, Ontario. The white stripe on his cap indicates that he is an air crew trainee.

    David Weddel
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"I found flying an Anson bomber from A to B quite routine, while flying a Tiger Moth from A to B could be exciting, if I performed a loop or a roll or both along the way."

Transcript

We flew the circuit and I would be flying for practicing takeoffs and landings and then we began climbing to about 6,000 feet. My instructor performed perfect loops, perfect rolls, stalls, spins and recoveries. What an experienced for me. Being stationed at Oshawa [Ontario], I could now solo fly over the farm in Quinsville [Ontario], where I was born. It was great to see dad’s jersey cows in the pasture field. And a few roars from my motor brought mother out on the porch, waving her apron. Six [Avro] Ansons [airplane primarily used for training], each with instructor and student took for cottage country to practice low level evasive flying. One Anson was designated to fly a course, the other five would play follow the leader. As you may know, there are many long narrow lakes in this part of cottage country. With propellers set on fine pitch and throttles wide open, the noise was deafening. The leader flew just above the water and below the treetops. The other four Ansons followed. It must have been frightening for the cottagers. I found flying an Anson bomber from A to B quite routine, while flying a [de Havilland] Tiger Moth [airplane used for training] from A to B could be exciting, if I performed a loop or a roll or both along the way.
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