Veteran Stories:
Michael Gerard Blaise “Chip” Young

Army

  • Michael G.B. Young in uniform, 1942.

    Michael G.B. Young
  • Group of men at post, Clyde River, Northwest Territories, 1940s. Michael Young is sitting in front row with whip.

    Michael G.B. Young
  • Air drop, Clyde River, Northwest Territories, 1940s.

    Michael G.B. Young
  • Michael Young, Clyde River, Northwest Territories, 1940s.

    Michael G.B. Young
  • Michael Young, Clyde River, Northwest Territories, 1940s.

    Michael G.B. Young
Enlarge Image
Listen to this story

"In fact, I ran into my older brother who was in the army, he was up there at Barriefield waiting on an overseas draft for England at that time."

Transcript

I went up around the Annapolis Valley [Nova Scotia], but the camp I finally went to, to take my training, my basic training, and my advanced training, was at the Barriefield [Camp], [in Kingston,] Ontario. And it was good up there, we lived in tents. In fact, I ran into my older brother who was in the army, he was up there at Barriefield waiting on an overseas draft for England at that time. The oldest brother, his name is Cletus, John Cletus, he’s up in Sudbury, up around Sudbury, Ontario or Sault Ste. Marie. He’s in his 90s now.

I believe, from Kingston, Ontario, when the first time, I was up in Barriefield and that and missed the drafts, I think it was after that that I went up to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. And, from Yellowknife, I went to Norman Wells, Northwest Territories. And I went to a place they called Baker Lake, Northwest Territories, as an army radio operator. And that was a four-man [station], there was a sergeant and a cook and three of us operators, by the Baker Lake, there were other [radio stations in the north], not very much. I can remember that, at times, I met Eskimos that had never seen a white man, a white person before, and the caribou herds used to, right on the camp, was right next to the station, right next to the caribou trail. Caribous start marching by, it might take five, six days, or a week for the whole herd to pass through. It was thousands upon thousands upon thousands. You wouldn’t believe it, it’s something you’d have to see to believe.

Follow us