Veteran Stories:
John Stuber

Army

  • Group photo taken the day before the patrol 20-21 May 1952.

    John Stuber
  • Contemporary photograph of Mr. John Stuber taken in Winnipeg August 2011.

    John Stuber
  • Discharge Papers 1952

Enlarge Image
Listen to this story

"one guy said, he yelled “they’re behind us” and they all took off. And of course, I used some pretty bad words when everybody took off and there was only three of us left on the hill."

Transcript

[Night of 20 May 1952 – describing patrol of Nabu-ri valley] And of course, we get about three quarters up and there was some heavy shelling going on. And one guy said, he yelled “they’re behind us” and they all took off. And of course, I used some pretty bad words when everybody took off and there was only three of us left on the hill. And that’s when he [Pte. Oueliette] got shot across the stomach and I think that was his buddy here [pointing to picture] and so I picked him up and I put him on my shoulder and he died on there going down the hill, he hit me on the back of the head to let him down from the pain, he was covered in blood. And of course, I carried him down to the bottom of the hill. It was such a shock to him that he was not capable of carrying the guy down. In fact, I even carried his rifle and my own and all my ammunition and this guy, he just came along behind us. And like I said, I was covered in blood when I got down there. And that really bothered me. It still bothers me today, sometimes I have a dream about that. where I got the strength from to throw him on my shoulder and carry him down and of course, he hit me in the back of the head to let him down because of the pain and of course, when he got partway down, he had died and he was bleeding real bad and then I was just covered in blood. But I yelled at these other guys, I said some nasty things for them taking off like they did. And that bothers me. After that I was so upset and I got sick. And I went up to the field hospital and they sent me back to Japan. And then that was about four days later and I never heard no more about it after that. See, another story then, when I was in the hospital, I met this nurse. She was a real blonde, good looking. And of course, I pursued her and I took her out several times. Then I went back to Korea and I thought, well, I’ll never see her again and when I came back, she was in Tokyo and I went to Tokyo and seen her up there. And then she came back to Korea. Then I said, I’d like to come to Australia, I says, we’ll get married. And here’s the thing I got from, that in yellow there, that I had a very hard time to get out of the . . . I was the only one that ever requested to get out of the service in Japan. And I was in Woolsey, Saskatchewan at the time when the war broke out and I thought, now, this is my chance, I’ve always wanted to travel, and I thought, this is my chance to see a little bit more of the world. And I had, like I say, the, the major says, there’s no way that we can let you go. And I said, well, if you don’t, I’m going to get married in Japan. And I said, then you’ll have to bring my wife to Canada. I said, because I won’t go without her, so. My mother, when I joined, I told her I joined the army to go to Korea, she shook her head and she says, “don’t go to Korea.” So, and I said, why, I says, I said, I’m going to go and she told me not to go. Anyway, I went. and she said you know, what you’ll do, you’ll join the army and you’ll end up being nothing but a drunkard. That’s what she told me. And I said, mom, I said, I promise you, I will never drink. And I never ever drank in my life. To this day, I don’t drink.
Follow us