Veteran Stories:
Donald Gordon Logan

Army

  • Left, James Hugh Logan, Donald's father and uncle Edward who was killed near Ypres, Belgium, in 1917. Picture taken circa 1916.

    Donald Logan
  • Mr. Jack Logan, Donald's brother in his flying officer uniform. Circa 1943-1944.

    Donald Logan
  • Mr. Donald Logan.

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"I remember coming on the railway several times and you know, all the way from Nova Scotia up to Camp Borden and everybody was always nice to you. It was surprising."

Transcript

I’m Donald Gordon Logan. I was born on December the 28th, 1926. And I joined the army in January of 1945. And I was fully trained but I never got overseas. I was very young of course so it didn’t matter an awful lot because I’d finished high school when I was 16 and I had to wait until I got 18 to get in the army, you see. And so I was just, I was working at […] in Amherst, Nova Scotia for that period and just while I was waiting. I had two brothers already in the forces and one of them was killed overseas before I joined and the other one was in the air force, sort of teaching kids to fly and they wouldn’t send him overseas, so he switched to the navy and went over. And he ended up after the war on the carriers and so on, he was flying from the carriers. Well, I was coming back off of, VE Day [Victory in Europe Day, May 1945], the normal sort of thing when you’re in the army, try to get as much time off as you can. And I was coming back and just came into this place, that’s all and back to my … People were surprised that I arrived back the day, from vacation. But I said, well, I mean, you have to do these things. On VJ Day [Victory over Japan Day, August 1945], I arrived back from, again I had been on a pass, you see, and they were really surprised when I checked into camp but I was supposed to the next day be moved so I wanted to get my stuff together. And so they were very surprised because I arrived back on time and everything else. Camp Borden [Ontario], it was a pretty good camp, it was big. But I liked when we were up in Meaford better, in Owen Sound, that was where we did a lot of training. But Camp Borden was our base, you see. I remember coming on the railway several times and you know, all the way from Nova Scotia up to Camp Borden and everybody was always nice to you. It was surprising. Well, of course, it was during the war and you had your uniform on and so on, so you know.
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