Veteran Stories:
Kenneth William John “Woot” Wootton

Army

  • Framed collection of memorabilia. Includes photograph of Ken Wootton, cap badges, shoulder flashes, ribbons, and medals.

    Kenneth William John Wootton
  • The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry, 1943. Kenneth William John Wootton is 10th from the right in the row which is second from the front. The photograph was taken in Horsham, England.

    Kenneth William John Wootton
  • Discharge certificate issued to Ken Wootton on January 14, 1946.

    Kenneth William John Wootton
  • Colour photograph of Ken Wootton in the uniform of The Lorne Scots Regiment.

    Kenneth William John Wootton
  • The Lorne Scots Regiment in British Columbia, circa 1942. Ken Wootton is at the top right and is 17 years old. The photograph was taken while training on Malahat Drive in Victoria, British Columbia.

    Kenneth William John Wootton
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"So you know it wasn’t all bad, and it wasn’t all good.We were doing the stuff we had to do and that was it. But it wasn’t something everybody should ever have to go through."

Transcript

Our unit fought on the beaches and they were pretty well knocked to pieces. And the second div. [division] then didn’t have to go in in the invasion, but we were sitting there as reserves. If it had gone bad, we’d have had to go in but as it happened, we were doing alright.

Our regiment, we didn’t have too many people left. So that was Verrières, the Battle of Verrières. And they were bringing up wounded and oh, picked up about four. And we had room for one more and there was a German there, he was a big guy. And he had terrible eyes, I can always remember him. And when I looked at him, he had no chin. He had his chin blown off, so I could see why he was mad. So we took him out too. So we evacuated everybody, it didn’t matter who it was.

Some of the toughest battles took place in France. Well, it was when we tried to close the doors on the Germans from getting away and breaking their army up in pieces. And we went into Falaise. I can remember driving down the street, and there’s two little kids, they were actually pulling the wagon down the middle of the road, down coming to Falaise.. And it was sad to see that, you know, because like where we were they going? But we couldn’t stop because we were in a convoy. But somebody would pick them up, that’s for sure. They could have been killed, walking down the middle of the road, there was shelling. Just two of them, a boy and a girl.

So you know it wasn’t all bad, and it wasn’t all good.We were doing the stuff we had to do and that was it. But it wasn’t something everybody should ever have to go through. Everybody has a different story. Like the war means different things to different people.

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