Veteran Stories:
Robert Omer “Bob” Garand

Navy

  • Mr. Garand in his Navy uniform. 1945.

    Robert Garand
  • The crew of HMCS LCI-1 Class Landing Craft Infantry (Large)-118 just before D-Day, June, 1944. Mr. Garand served on HMCS LCI(L)-118 as a Diesel Engineer.

    Robert Garand
  • HMCS LCI(L)-118 at Portsmouth (England) loaded with troops waiting to cross the Channel to Normandy, Summer 1944.

    Robert Garand
  • HMCS LCI(L)-118 of the 262nd Flotilla disembarking troops in NAN sector of Juno Beach, Summer 1944.

    Robert Garand
  • Mr. Garand's medals, from left to right: 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; Canadian Volunteer Service Medal; The War Medal 1939-1945.

    Robert Garand
  • Mr. Bob Garand in his Royal Canadian Legion uniform, August 4th, 2012. He is in the Town of The Pas Centennial Parade as both he and the town turn 100 years old in 2012.

    Len Garand
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"We kept going back and forth taking troops across [the English Channel]. We made that I don’t remember how many – 17 trips or something from Southampton to the beach."

Transcript

We left the day before, the night before about 7:00 o’clock. We load our troops from Southampton [England]. We were supposed to end on the beach at 7:00 in the morning but we couldn’t, the beach wasn’t clear enough. We couldn’t because we 150 troops so we had to wait until 11:00 o’clock before we could land it, until they cleared the beach. There was still a lot of mines, small mines left with popsicle-like steel things in [them]. Got a few holes punched in our ship. Then we went in there at 18 knots and we couldn’t – as fast as we could go so we could land as far as that goes so the soldier wouldn’t have far to walk on the water. Then the tide went down and we had to stay there until 6:00 o’clock that night, sit on the beach in France. It was pretty hot there when we first got there but it really quieted right down at the end. There was no fire left. But going over like that night it was fire all over and the sky was just like fireworks. Oh yeah, they were bad because – and well we got a few holes punched in our ship. Our skipper got hit by shrapnel and the crew – the skipper got shrapnel in his neck. I guess he was pretty bad after too. He took the ship back but – and then he went to the hospital. I heard he had a lot of trouble. We kept going back and forth taking troops across [the English Channel]. We made that I don’t remember how many – 17 trips or something from Southampton to the beach. And then we left our ship at the white cliffs of Dover [England], we went in there and they were still firing coming across there where they got the big guns. They were shooting across there so we had to have a small stream to go so they wouldn’t see us. And we left our ship there and then after that I got leave and I came back to Canada.
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