Veteran Stories:
Petar Radan

Army

  • Title page and foreword to Petar Radan's memoirs in the Memory Project Archive.

    Petar Radan
  • Radan family portrait. Petar and wife Mimi (Milica) Radan in the front centre, seated.

    Petar Radan
  • Petar Radan in uniform during the war.

    Petar Radan
  • Photo of Petar Radan and his fellow Chetnick soldiers in front of the tent they lived in while in Italy. From left to right: Jovan Ilic, Nikola Ilic, Ljuban Ilic, and Petar Radan (far right).

    Petar Radan
  • Petar Radan and fellow soldiers in Camp Eboli, Italy. Petar Radan and Mirko Ilic are first and second from the left, respectively. Laying down (left to right) are Vaso Stojakovic and Dmitar Pasic. On the far right, in the cap, is Branko Pasic.

    Petar Radan
  • Class picture of students at the High School in Eboli, Italy. School director Stanko Dragosavljevic is seated in the centre, and also in the front row, third from left is Petar Radan.

    Petar Radan
  • Train cars that took Petar Radan et other Chetniks from Eboli, Italy to Munster Lager in Germany. Photo taken in 1947.

    Petar Radan
  • Petar Radan with his father Djuro in Southhampton, UK, about to board the S.S. Atlantic for Canada. Photo taken in 1952.

    Petar Radan
  • Copies of correspondence received over the years from Vojvoda Momilo Djujic, leader of the Chetnicks (Movement of Serbian Chetniks Ravne Gore), who was living in the USA.

    Petar Radan
  • Vojvoda Momcilo Djujic, leader of the Chetnicks, accompanied by Petar and his wife Mimi Radan.

    Petar Radan
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Listen to this story

"Couple of lorries came… Army trucks, there's maybe a dozen or two dozen Ustaše came to our village, and then they tried to gather us, and then we knew right away. We smelled it, and then I hid with my neighbour... under a bridge."

Transcript

I remember very well as a young boy, I was, I think, 13 when the Ustaše* came over to our village and they killed [a] few people, and then the Italians actually… Italian army saved us from Ustaše because they were doing some… some terrible things. Then with… my parents were working on the field and whatnot, you know, and the Ustaše came… The lorry came… couple of lorries came… Army trucks, there's maybe a dozen or two dozen Ustaše came to our village, and then they tried to gather us, and then we knew right away. We smelled it, and then I hid with my neighbour, and under the road there was like a bridge, but it's only bridge, it's maybe… It's two feet by three feet or something, just the water when the rain falls down, so we hid there.

And then the Ustaše tried to kill us… Not me, but the neighbours, and then we hid, and then the Italian army came over because they realized how… what crime the Ustaše did, and that they… Then the Ustaše left my village and they run away. The whole village, all the people they were Chetniks.** There was no communist member, or anybody, from my village or from my area. We were all in Chetniks, on the Chetniks side. And then my father was and my cousin was, and so, and things became so hard, I joined with them and had been ever since. I remember this precisely in […] Croatian, […] Premoria, like it's called at that time. I was so hungry, and I didn’t have anything to eat for two days, and we were wet, because rain was going on, so me and my friend, we skipped out from the line that was walking… You know going…

 

* The Ustaše was a pro-facist insurgent group in the Independent State of Croatia.

**The Chetniks were anti-fascist Serbian resistance fighters.

 

 

 

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