Veteran Stories:
Clement Peake

Army

  • Clement Peake's headstone at Doullens Communal Cemetery in Doullens, France. Collection courtesy of Michelle White.

    Clement Peake's headstone at Doullens Communal Cemetery in Doullens, France. Collection courtesy of Michelle White.
  • Mary McKeen at Clement Peake's grave. 1998. Mrs. McKeen is a friend of the Peake family and visited the grave on their behalf.

    Mary McKeen at Clement Peake's grave. 1998. Mrs. McKeen is a friend of the Peake family and visited the grave on their behalf.
Enlarge Image
Listen to this story

Transcript

Clement Peake served with the 2nd Battalion of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps during World War I after enlisting at the age of 18. He was killed in action on April 18, 1918.

Clement was the eldest son of Charles and Anne Peake and was brother to Andrew, William, Charles, Eleanor, Loretta, Mary, Ruth and Margaret.

Mary and Ruth were very young children when they lost their brother. Though they cannot remember him, they knew well the loss that their parents felt over the years. Their brother Charlie lied about his age, saying he was sixteen to be able to join the war effort. Luckily, Charlie returned safely to his family.

Clement is buried in Doullens Communal Cemetery in Doullens, France. This cemetery is behind a community church. It is attached to the church's cemetery but maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. This graveyard tells the story of the many injured men from the surrounding areas of battles from February 1916 until April 1918. The field hospitals that John McCrae made famous in his poem "Flanders Fields" was the type of care the injured men were given. Lack of proper facilities and medicine were responsible for many deaths. When you see the closeness of the graves, you can see the large numbers that died in this area in such a short time.

Follow us