Veteran Stories:
Freddy Walls

Army

  • Picture taken one week before Freddy Walls left the Service, May 1946.

    Freddy Walls
  • Freddy Walls, November 25, 2009.

    Historica Canada
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"Well we were driving along, the first thing, big bang. They had small artillery and small arms fire and they just let it all go at one time and I was just driving along and the first thing, everything went haywire."

Transcript

My name is Fred Walls. I was born in Chatham, New Brunswick, on October the 28th, 1923. The 30th of July, I landed in France at a place called Caen. And I hauled ammunition up to the Fort Garry Horse Tank Regiment, hauled rations up to the infantry and I moved hospitals from one place to another and I also hauled gasoline up to the Fort Garry Horse Tank Regiment. We were never in the midst of the battle. We were always up, when we delivered the shells or the ammunition or the petrol, it was always back on the lines. And then there’s trucks from the artillery or from the infantry used to come and pick it up. And from then on, I went up into Belgium and Holland and up in a place called Arnhem in Holland. The Germans had attacked our convoy. Well we were driving along, the first thing, big bang. They had small artillery and small arms fire and they just let it all go at one time and I was just driving along and the first thing, everything went haywire. The truck rolled over in the ditch, threw the front wheels off my truck, rolled over in the ditch. I just said to myself, wow, this could be it. Yeah. So I was three or four broken ribs and there’s shrapnel on my right leg and I was bleeding quite a bit. So I just stayed in the ditch for cover. And then when it was all over, the medics come and put me on a makeshift stretcher, put me in the back of a truck and hauled me away. The way we run our convoys was the first six trucks were empty. It was a decoy. And the next trucks were loaded. At that time, that our convoy was attacked, the first six trucks were targeted, but mine was about the fifth one and there was two or three fellows killed up in the lead trucks at that time. Quite an experience. And you didn’t realize at the time what you went through. You got into France, went through all this and when you look back, it’s just like a dream. Yeah. You were so young then. It didn’t really register until the war was over. Proud, proud.
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