Welcome to the Memory Project

Stories of Service and Sacrifice

Allison Furlotte

Allison Furlotte

Army • Home Town: Nash Creek, New Brunswick

And in the middle of the night, maybe two or three o'clock in the morning, really a dark night, an explosion went off not too far from the safe trail we had to patrol. And I must have had my back turned because it got me in the back of the leg.

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Arsène Dubé

Arsène Dubé

Army • Home Town: Rivière-Verte, New Brunswick

The transcription in English is not available at this moment. Please refer to the transcript in French.

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Edison MacDonald

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Aimé Michaud

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Claude LaFrance

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Francis Bayne

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John Woods

John Woods

Army • Home Town: Ottawa, Ontario

You know, we were taking a quite a hammering from artillery and I really didn’t realize how bad it was at the time. But when I got down and looked back up at the hill I thought to myself, “My God, we’re lucky to have gotten away with it.”

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Peter Chisholm

Peter Chisholm

Army • Home Town: Canada

It was within days that we started to map up the minefield locations, secure the fences, destroy ordnances left lying around, recover bodies… all those tasks were started quickly after the 27th of July.

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Gerry O'Pray

Gerry O'Pray

Army • Home Town: Ontario

A lot of things happened while I was in the Congo. One of the things I remember was kind of a culture shock for me, as a young man coming from Nova Scotia. There were thirty-four different countries, I think, in that mission in the Congo.

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Jack Neilson

Jack Neilson

Army • Home Town: Ontario

Our mandate was to prevent civil war, arrange a cease fire and halt all military operations. Prior to this was the apprehension and detention of all foreign military and para-military personnel not under UN command. And it was specifically related to mercenaries. Use of force was authorized.

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Camille Ouellet

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Don McLean

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Ron Myers

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Susan Beharriell

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Wayne Marshall

Wayne Marshall

Army • Home Town: Ontario

I joined the Army in the fall of 1952, and went into a new apprentice soldier programme for boys that were sixteen years old. It was part of the regular Army. I served on continuously from then right up until just before I was fifty-six years old, giving me almost forty years of regular service.

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George Myatte

George Myatte

Army • Home Town: Ontario

The United Nations decided to send in two battalions, that were outside the airport waiting in armoured vehicles – that would have been the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, also the Van Doo regiment. That, basically, insured that the airport was going to be secure.

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Wilfrid Millen

Wilfrid Millen

Army • Home Town: Ontario

On August 8, 1918 near Cayeux (en-Santerre) about twelve miles southeast of Amiens he was wounded in the left shoulder and back. He died of his wounds on August 10, 1918 on 10 Ambulance Train en route to a Rouen hospital.

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Sid Meltzer

Sid Meltzer

Army • Home Town: Ontario

My grandfather Joseph, who had served in the Austrian Army before settling in England, installed him with the disciplined life that the military had to offer, and its advantages.

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Norman McHolden

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John Newton

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Paul Métivier

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Thomas Marion

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Joseph Mulvaney

Joseph Mulvaney

Army • Home Town: Ontario

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John Laurie Paterson

John Laurie Paterson

Army • Home Town: Manitoba

John was stringing communication lines under a heavy barrage of shelling and machine gun fire. This was the Battle of Amiens, August 8 to 16, 1918.

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Fernand Léveillée

Fernand Léveillée

Navy • Home Town: Montreal, Quebec

A submarine is underneath, in the water. We used to send at every second a sound [signal]: bong, bong, bong, bong. Oop! Bong! We hit something.

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Clyde Bougie

Clyde “Bogy” Bougie

Army • Home Town: Barrie, Ontario

But when I fire my ten rounds, Sergeant said, he used to say, “I think you’re cheating.” When they brought the target up, they seen it was just a small one inch hole, all the bullets were going into the same hole.

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Margarita “Madge” Trull

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Douglas “Doug” Petrie

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Frederick “Fred” Carter

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Alex Campbell

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Roy Heron

Roy Heron

Army • Home Town: Montreal, Quebec

I made it a point to be very active and help in the children of both in Holland and in Germany, because kids had nothing to do with the war and they need help and kids were my prime factor in helping

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James Ritchie

James “Jim” Ritchie

Army • Home Town: London, Ontario, Canada

We never had any problem with them. We’d go to their barber shops and get our hair cut. We were invited to their homes for meals.

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Join Martin Middlebrook, British military historian for a rare Canadian appearance Sept 4 at the Canadian War Museum. t.co/h74edDQBAy
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