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Stories of Service and Sacrifice

William Manning

William Manning

Army • Home Town: Sorel, Quebec

We killed the civilians, in a sense. So it was... it was terrible. And I remember Mr. Dextraze, he said, “Never say this while I’m alive.” I went up to his dugout and he was crying. And he was crying and he said, “Never say that you saw me crying while I’m alive.”

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Claude LaFrance

Claude LaFrance

Air Force • Home Town: Quebec City, Quebec

Of course, at that time, you’re on your own. You’re in cloud. You can’t see anything but the enemy has radar so obviously you’re vulnerable. And you spend a lot of your time not only looking at clouds but also looking behind you.

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Joseph Gallant

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Frank Wood

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Peter Chance

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Frank Lucano

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Raphael Dael

Raphael “Ralph” Dael

Army • Home Town: Ypres, Belgium

We have to realize, that 1952 it was a trench war. And we got visits during the night, always during the night, by the enemy. But we had to make sure that they didn’t get into our lines.

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Robert Stewart

Robert “Bob” Stewart

Army • Home Town: Saint John, New Brunswick

And that’s what bothered me the most anyway was the sense of failure when you lost somebody. Because you always think, well, if I’d known a little more, maybe I could have saved him.

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George Myatte

George Myatte

Army • Home Town: Ontario

The United Nations decided to send in two battalions, that were outside the airport waiting in armoured vehicles – that would have been the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, also the Van Doo regiment. That, basically, insured that the airport was going to be secure.

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Gerry O'Pray

Gerry O'Pray

Army • Home Town: Ontario

A lot of things happened while I was in the Congo. One of the things I remember was kind of a culture shock for me, as a young man coming from Nova Scotia. There were thirty-four different countries, I think, in that mission in the Congo.

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Wayne Marshall

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Shannon Matechuk

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Don McLean

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Camille Ouellet

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Susan Beharriell

Susan Beharriell

Air Force • Home Town: Ontario

They told me I couldn't fly in a high performance jet aircraft because "my female parts would be damaged." It was quite a thrill breaking the sound barrier at 100 feet, climbing straight up and doing rolls and loops above the clouds.

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Ron Myers

Ron Myers

Air Force • Home Town: Saskatchewan

Our commitment was to do observations along the ADL, which spread from the Mediterranean down to the Gulf of Aqaba - the tip of the Sinai Peninsula -re-supplying Army and UN outposts along the ADL by air.

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John Frederick Mould

John Frederick Mould

Army • Home Town: Ontario

He received a very small pension, for he became deaf, caused by the shells, and he also suffered from gas poisoning. When he came home I guess he had trench mouth and he had to have his teeth pulled out.

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Albert Abdey

Albert Abdey

Army • Home Town: Richmond, Surrey, United Kingdom

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Thomas Marion

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Joseph Mulvaney

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Wilfrid Millen

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Norman McHolden

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John Laurie Paterson

John Laurie Paterson

Army • Home Town: Manitoba

John was stringing communication lines under a heavy barrage of shelling and machine gun fire. This was the Battle of Amiens, August 8 to 16, 1918.

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John Newton

John Newton

Army • Home Town: Ontario

It goes right through until August the 9th, 1918 and it stops there, and that was the day that the Canadian Army struck off at the Battle of Amiens, which was the beginning of the end of the war. I guess he was so busy after that battle started that he never had time to write in the diary.

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Reg Harrison

Reg “Crash” Harrison

Air Force • Home Town: Lorlie, Saskatchewan

I better keep this thing straight, it's my first trip on the Lanc. I looked up there and I see all this flame and there's a Halifax burning and, “Oh god, I better stay in between these walls of fire.”

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Robert Guy

Robert Guy

Army • Home Town: Barking, United Kingdom

And I knew that I had shot many of these young soldiers at that time of meeting them. And that seemed to stick in my memory, their faces.

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Bill Hann

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Helen Rapp

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Frank Moore

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John Covan

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Lionel Martin

Lionel “Jack” Martin

Army • Home Town: Boden, Alberta

And what it said in German on it was: ‘the worst is yet to come.’ The Germans called us the black devils, the black devils with dirty faces.

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David Peat

David Peat

Army • Home Town: Loverna, Saskatchewan

Well, they fired, the Germans turned a mortar and a bit exploded and these guys all went down in a group, all over the place.

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A video created by Springbank Middle School at their Remembrance activities last November, with The Memory... t.co/14bBej8PJp
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