Welcome to the Memory Project

Stories of Service and Sacrifice

Allison Furlotte

Allison Furlotte

Army • Home Town: Nash Creek, New Brunswick

And in the middle of the night, maybe two or three o'clock in the morning, really a dark night, an explosion went off not too far from the safe trail we had to patrol. And I must have had my back turned because it got me in the back of the leg.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Robert Faulkner

Robert Faulkner

Army • Home Town: Ottawa, Ontario

What they do is they fire two mortar bombs and then when they’re screaming in, they drop in another one. And once there’s two explosions somebody will get up and run to better cover and that third one sometimes gets you.

Listen Audio Interview Listen

William Yuill

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Arthur Lortie

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Frank Smyth

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Claude Petit

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen
Edison MacDonald

Edison MacDonald

Army • Home Town: Sydney, Nova Scotia

But on the 3rd of May, we were run over by battalions of Chinese and on that night we lost 26 killed. I think there was 40 people wounded and there was 7 or 8 taken prisoner. Now that all happened on one night and that was the scariest night of my life. That was the famous Battle of 187.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Roy Jardine

Roy Jardine

Army • Home Town: Oliver, British Columbia

And both barrels on my 50 cal were gone, couldn’t use it anymore, and that was the end of the battle, by then, anyways. It’s a terrible thing to have to stand up and fire when everybody can see you.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Ron Myers

Ron Myers

Air Force • Home Town: Saskatchewan

Our commitment was to do observations along the ADL, which spread from the Mediterranean down to the Gulf of Aqaba - the tip of the Sinai Peninsula -re-supplying Army and UN outposts along the ADL by air.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Susan Beharriell

Susan Beharriell

Air Force • Home Town: Ontario

They told me I couldn't fly in a high performance jet aircraft because "my female parts would be damaged." It was quite a thrill breaking the sound barrier at 100 feet, climbing straight up and doing rolls and loops above the clouds.

Listen Audio Interview Listen

Wayne Marshall

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Jack Neilson

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

George Myatte

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Gerry O'Pray

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen
Camille Ouellet

Camille Ouellet

Air Force • Home Town: Quebec

The transcription in English is not available at this moment. Please refer to the transcript in French.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Don McLean

Don McLean

Army • Home Town: Manitoba

I feel Canada should be very proud of its peacekeepers. They've been involved in peacekeeping for many, many years and have served on every mission that's come up.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
John Laurie Paterson

John Laurie Paterson

Army • Home Town: Manitoba

John was stringing communication lines under a heavy barrage of shelling and machine gun fire. This was the Battle of Amiens, August 8 to 16, 1918.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Thomas Marion

Thomas Marion

Army • Home Town: Quebec

Later in the night when they were back at their start point, they could hear soldiers shouting, "Help, 73rd! Help, 73rd!" They were all tied up in the wire and the 73rd couldn't get to them.

Listen Audio Interview Listen

Albert Abdey

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Sid Meltzer

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Norman McHolden

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

George Scherer

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen
John Frederick Mould

John Frederick Mould

Army • Home Town: Ontario

He received a very small pension, for he became deaf, caused by the shells, and he also suffered from gas poisoning. When he came home I guess he had trench mouth and he had to have his teeth pulled out.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Wilfrid Millen

Wilfrid Millen

Army • Home Town: Ontario

On August 8, 1918 near Cayeux (en-Santerre) about twelve miles southeast of Amiens he was wounded in the left shoulder and back. He died of his wounds on August 10, 1918 on 10 Ambulance Train en route to a Rouen hospital.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Jim Peters

Jim “Jim/Pete” Peters

Navy • Home Town: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

I look up ahead and I see this wall of water coming at us. It turned out to be a 60 foot rogue wave and I was up to my chest in water.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Hilda Cann

Hilda Cann

Army • Home Town: Carman, Manitoba

He was paralyzed from the neck down and he said to me one day, I want you to promise me something.

Listen Audio Interview Listen

Everrett Cromwell

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Herménégilde Dussault

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Alice Samuel

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen

Melbourne “Mel” Le Marquand

Army Listen Audio Interview Listen
Hyman Arlin

Hyman Arlin

Army • Home Town: Bialostok, Poland

Finally I found him and I sent a little note along to each soldier to pass it along to the seventh guy in the line. He jumped up and he scared people, they thought there was an emergency

Listen Audio Interview Listen
Frank Aldred

Frank “Huck, Joe Fink” Aldred

Navy • Home Town: Toronto, Ontario

So we hauled the CAT and it was all blown apart. It was the sub had fired a torpedo, which homed in on our CAT and blew it all to bits.

Listen Audio Interview Listen
facebook Twitter