Veteran Stories:
Jim Dockstader

Navy

  • A photograph of Jim Dockstader at a September 2012 Memory Project event in Saskatoon.

    Jim Dockstader
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"The Americans had asked for help our retreating troops get out of that area. So we were sent up to help with what we could. We had to go up the river into Chinnampo Harbour at night and it was quite an experience because we didn’t know if it was mined or anything like that."

Transcript

Well mostly we were plane guards for aircraft carriers and just different patrols up and down the coast.  And on a couple of occasions we went ashore, a certain number of boats crew go ashore and on a couple of occasions we found civilians in pretty rough shape.  So our captain, Jeffrey Brock, started a movement to bring food to the different islands.  He got commendations for that.

I was waiting for my course on Torpedoed Anti-submarine, so when I got to the [HMCS] Cayuga I was called NQ, Able Seaman NQ, and I wound up on gun batteries.  AA [anti-aircraft], I was on a 40 millimetre on shore bombardments or the like.  I was on X-gun, twin four [inch guns], on x, near the quarterdeck.  I was a load member.  Well, it was picking up the 4-inch shells out of the ready-use locker or the hatch, and then putting it in a gun, loading it.

Very early August, we did a bombardment at Pusan in the perimeter around Pusan.  We went in and stayed a couple of miles out and whatever the targets were, I wasn’t specifically knowledgeable but we carried out bombardment with A and B guns which were twin 4-inch guns.

Well, we did a lot of incidental bombardments of targets on different islands and different and I guess our big one was Chinnampo.  That would be in December of 1950.

We had in about October, we thought that the war was basically over, so they got us ready to go back to Canada but we went to Hong Kong and we were there about a week when the Chinese entered the war and then we were ordered back.  And one of the things, Chinnampo, the Americans had asked for help our retreating troops get out of that area.  So we were sent up to help with what we could.  We had to go up the river into Chinnampo Harbour at night and it was quite an experience because we didn’t know if it was mined or anything like that.

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